Who Dies By Suicide?

A closer look at those who take their own lives

Suicide affects people across all age groups. It does not discriminate against social, ethnic or religious groups. However, people in certain demographic groups are more prone to die by suicide than those in other demographic groups. According to the American Association of Suicidology, white males account for 72 percent of all suicides. Ninety percent of all suicides are committed by white males and white females. By contrast, the suicide rate for African-Americans is about half that of Caucasians.

Older or adolescent white males are generally at higher risk, as are patients with a history of attempted suicide and those suffering from depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, drug dependency or abuse disorders, and schizophrenia.

Young people who are bullied at risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, young people who are threatened with or experience physical violence, or who are injured by peers, report more suicidal thoughts and behavior than young people who are not victimized.

It’s important for parents and teachers to monitor young people for severe mood swings, depression, anxiety, or alcohol and drug abuse, all of which may be suicidal signs. Friends can be especially helpful in assessing a young person’s mood, since the person probably shares more with them than with parents or teachers.

How Skip Simpson can help

The suicide of a single person can have a lasting impact on a wide circle of friends, families and communities. If someone in your family or a loved one recently died by suicide, contact a lawyer who cares. Contact the Law Offices of Skip Simpson. Your consultation is free and confidential. Call 214-618-8222 to see how we can help.